Last updated: 09:11 / Wednesday, 30 December 2015
Says Franklin Templeton

2016 Will Have Attractive Valuations Across The Global Bond And Currency Markets

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2016 Will Have Attractive Valuations Across The Global Bond And Currency Markets
  • Global growth remains on trend and deflation risks remain low, according to Franklin Templeton
  • "We don’t expect solvency issues in many emerging markets"
  • "An unconstrained strategy has a broad set of options for a rising-rate environment"

According to Michael Hasenstab, Chief Investment Officer at Templeton Global Macro, “at the start of 2016, we are encouraged by the vast set of fundamentally attractive valuations across the global bond and currency markets. We expect continued depreciation of the euro and yen, rising US Treasury yields, and currency appreciation in select emerging markets.”

During the next year, the investment professional expects a dichotomy of Monetary Policies, with rising interest rates from the US Federal Reserve and Quantitative Easing from the BOJ and ECB. Hasenstab also mentions that “fears of global deflation are unwarranted” and that him and his team  “do not anticipate a global recession.”  Their growth projections for 2016 are 2%–3% for the United States, above 1% for the eurozone, around 1% for Japan and between 6% and 7% for China. In regards to the Asian giant, Hasenstab believes that newer sectors such as the service one, will fuel wage growth and help support consumption.

Looking at Emerging markets, the Franklin Templeton expert believes that Solvency will not be a mayor issue in the area. “Emerging markets were often regarded as being in near-crisis condition during the second half of 2015. We believe concerns of a systemic crisis have been exaggerated” says Hasenstab, adding that commodity exporters, and emerging markets with poor macro fundamentals, remain vulnerable. Therefore, “investors should not view the emerging-markets asset class as a whole but should instead selectively distinguish between individual economies.” Hasenstab highlights Mexico and Malaysia as countries with strong fundamentals and solid domestic sources of financing, which will allow them to raise interest rates either in conjunction with US interest-rate hikes or shortly thereafter, while countries like Turkey or South Africa will most likely be negatively impacted by US interest-rate hikes.

Still, he believes that “an unconstrained global strategy is the most effective way to position for a rising-rate environment because it provides access to the full global opportunity set.”
For 2016 he remains optimist, “we are encouraged by the vast set of fundamentally attractive valuations across the global bond and currency markets.” And favors currencies “in countries where inflation is picking up and growth remains healthy, yet the local currency remains fundamentally undervalued. Looking ahead, we expect continued depreciation of the euro and yen, rising US Treasury yields, and currency appreciation in select emerging markets,” he concludes.
 

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